Month: January 2019

Have It Your Way — What Makes Architecture Successful

The architect’s job isn’t to use the client as a way to accomplish their very own creations, but to design a party of their client’s life by meeting all the essential program requirements with creativity and imagination. A sheet of architecture may look great in a magazine, but if it does not satisfy the client’s requirements in a beautiful and practical way, it’s failed.

How does one create architecture that is successful? The answer lies in its very purpose.

DWYER DESIGN

First, by means of background, I participated in a ideabook discussion centered around some odd elements of a project I had recently completed. The layout was provocative and elicited many comments, some sort and some not.

As far as I love a compliment, I was most absorbed by the remarks that began, “If this were my house, I’d have … ” Or, “If it had been me, I would have done … ” This discovered a common stereotype of an architect’s work: that we are arrogant egomaniacs who bully customers into building our very own visions. I will agree that those architects do indeed exist (that sentence might have just cost me some future American Institute of Architects membership), and I often have to fight this back stereotype early in my client relationships.

But rather than talking stereotypes, let us talk about what structure should be. My answer to these remarks? Obviously. Obviously it could be different. Obviously it might reflect you.

When I had been a musician, and individual A from a small town in Michigan hired me to write a piece of music which has been a party of her life, that piece of music could be significantly different than a piece of music composed to celebrate the life of individual B, who lives in Los Angeles. That is the way it should be, and structure is only frozen music ( or so said Johann Wolfgang von Goethe).

Bruce Wright

Too frequently a work of design is judged unfairly since it is supposed to be the product of a ego-driven architect bullying a client into building the architect’s vision. But the very best design is in reality a product of a client eager to talk about her or his eccentricities and an architect who’s willing to integrate those eccentricities into a unique and imaginative structure.

Spry Architecture

As I said in my remarks, if this were your house, possibly the fireplace shown here could be wrapped in steel. If the house belonged to Colonel Sanders, the fireplace could be wrapped in chicken feathers.

Russell

That’s the best thing about design: individualization. A detail which arouses a personal thought or feeling for the homeowner.

Spry Architecture

This floor plan is for a client who dislikes right angles. In her words: “If my house has one right angle, I will be very unhappy.”

What a professional architect misses by not picking up on a client’s small eccentricities is an opportunity for individualization that is likely to produce the structure special and bring it to life.

SeARCH Architecture and Urban Planning

Architecture isn’t about perfect universal solutions. Those do not exist. It is about solutions appropriate to the context of the project. The context is the client’s requirements, site conditions, climate, budget and so on.

Kuhl Design Build LLC

I really like this example of individualization, since it resembles a kid in a giant washing machine. Architecture is always best viewed through the eyes of a youngster’s imagination.

Spry Architecture

I really like the giraffe head in this house since it provides a whimsy to the space that reflects the client’s comedy. It is amusing, and modern structure frequently takes itself too seriously.

And I really like the stone fireplace in the third picture from the top since the stone is personal to the homeowner, a piece of the past. The stone makes that house her house.

That is architecture.

See related

Summer Plants: How to Grow Taller

There is no competition: Homegrown tomatoes, freshly harvested, flavor best. Given that, including them at a summer vegetable garden is a no-brainer. The following question is, which to grow? There are tomatoes for every single region, from Alaska with its short summers to the cool Pacific Northwest to the hot and humid South.

However there are other considerations besides climate. Would you like giant beefsteak tomatoes, salad tomatoes, miniature cherry tomatoes or sauce or adhesive berries? Are you dedicated to “traditional” dark reddish fruits, or are you intrigued by berries that are rosy pink, orange, yellow, green, striped or so dim a purple they seem black? Do you want to come back to your origins with heirloom varieties, plant one of the newer hybrids or mix and match? Finally, do you want a single crop or one which lasts from summer until frost kills the plants?

You may even decide if you want a tidy and neat, though less prolific, manufacturer, called a determinate variety, or one of the more sprawling, bigger indeterminate (vining) types. Determinate varieties generally reach only about 3 ft, need minimal support and produce a harvest all at one time. Indeterminate varieties can spread to 16 ft and do best with assistance; they create a harvest over an extended season. Semideterminate varieties have attributes of both kinds.

More manuals to developing your own vegetables

Margie Grace – Grace Design Associates

When to plant: Establish starts or nursery plants when the soil is warm and there’s no danger of frost. To grow from seed, start seeds indoors five to eight months before your intended planting date.

Days to maturity: 50 to 90 times when the plants have been set out

moderate requirement: Total sun

Water requirement: Regular and deep watering, but let dry out between waterings

Favorites: Amish Paste, beefsteak, Better Boy, Big Beef, Big Boy, Black Krim, Brandywine, Caspian Pink, Celebrity, Cherokee Purple, Dona, Early Girl, Fourth of July, Green Zebra, Homestead 24, Isis Candy, Kellogg’s Breakfast, Mortgage Lifter, Oregon Spring, Ozark Pink, Paul Robeson, Roma, San Marzano, Siberia, Siletz, Stupice, Sub Arctic Max 1, Sun Gold, Supersweet 100, Sweet 100, Viva Italia

To grow from seed, start indoors five to eight months before your intended planting date. Plant tomatoes in the earth after they have at least two sets of mature leaves.

Planting: Wait until frost is past and the soil has warmed up before planting berries outside. Choose a website with rich, well-drained, neutral or slightly acidic soil; amend your soil when it is either alkaline or quite acidic. If fusarium or verticillium wilt is a problem in your area, do not plant where you have planted berries in the previous two decades. Start looking for a website in full sun for at least six and preferably eight hours every day. Cherry tomatoes may take less sunlight, but the sunnier the spot, the better the results.

If you don’t want to start from seed, you can generally find a good choice of transplants at nurseries, including unusual and heirloom varieties. Start looking for plants which are short and sturdy rather than tall and lanky and that haven’t yet set blossoms or fruit.

Ways to Get Your Garden Launched With Seeds

Andrea Meyers

Infection notes: Tomatoes are highly susceptible to a range of ailments. Seeds which are resistant to the common and destructive of these diseases are labeled as follows: A (alternaria leaf spot), F (fusarium wilt), FF (Race 1 and Race 2 fusarium wilt), L (septonia leafspot), N (nematodes), T (tobacco mosaic virus) and V (verticillium wilt). Check to see whether these diseases are a problem in your area and select seeds so.

Remove the bottom two sets of leaves from every transplant, whether nursery purchased or started from seed. Dig a hole deep enough to cover the stem up towards the bottom of the rest of the leaves and then add amendments. Place from the plants; insert dirt and business the plant set up.

Leave 2-3 feet between plants whenever they will be staked or in cages; 3 to 4 ft if you would like to let them grow unfettered.

If you are growing in pots: Look for containers which are at least 20 g; a half barrel is a good choice. Cherry tomatoes can be grown in slightly bigger containers, but select as large a size as you can. Some folks swear by upside down containers; others find they are not as productive.

Whatever you choose, make sure that there is good drainage. Fill the container with well-amended potting soil and plant as described above.

Steve Masley Consulting and Design

Nicolock Paving Stones and Retaining Walls

When you’ve planted the berries, whether from the ground or a container, then water them thoroughly. If you reside in a place particularly vulnerable to cutworms, put collars around the seedlings at this time.

This is also the ideal time to bring any bets. They may be traditional tomato cages, stakes or any sturdy support, including a woven service of branches. Nonmetal stakes or cages won’t burn the plant if they get hot. Determinate types need little to no staking. Other forms can be left to sprawl, but getting them off the ground helps prevent foliage and soil-borne ailments and keeps the fruit from rotting or bringing pests.

Erin Ponte Landscape Design

Growing-season care: Water regularly, directing the water to the base of the plant rather than using overhead sprinklers, and allow the soil dry out between waterings. You might want to water only every week to ten days, depending upon your climate. Attempt to prevent seesawing on water programs — too much one time, then excessive drying out — as this may lead to fruit split along with other issues. Cut back on watering as the fruit sets.

Tomatoes do not need an excessive amount of food. If you have rich soil, you are probably alright. If your land is not as rich, just lightly put in a low-nitrogen fertilizer every couple of weeks from the beginning of blossoms until you finish picking. You might also apply controlled-release fertilizer or utilize a diluted foliage fertilizer. Many experts recommend worm tea.

As plants grow, utilize soft ties to attach the stalks to the support. If you are using a cage, keep the branches indoors. Some people propose slough off the suckers that brow between the stem and the branches. It is not necessary; doing so will result in bigger fruit but a general smaller crop.

Note: Lightly brushing the blossoms with your palms or a paintbrush can aid in pollination.

Managing fleas: The pests that bother other vegetables will not leave tomatoes alone either. Aphids, Colorado potato beetles, cutworms, flea beetles, leaf miners, melon flies (in tropical areas), nematodes and whiteflies can all cause problems. Tomato hornworms are several other common pests.

Practice good gardening techniques and look for organic solutions to the typical problems, including picking off the hornworms and ruining them. Gophers and other tiny animals — like raccoons, birds, rodents and, in my own case, a cocker spaniel who considers just-ripe tomatoes the ideal bite — may also wreak havoc on your harvest.

Gopher cages may be effective, and good fencing may different dogs and other hungry creatures in the fruit.

Amy Renea

Diseases can be more of a problem. A laundry list includes late blight, leaf roll, blossom-end rot, wilts and tobacco mosaic virus.

Proper garden care, particularly if watering, will help prevent problems, but when the illness is severe, you will need to destroy the plants, keeping any diseased plants out of your mulch.

Gardening with Confidence®

Harvest: select the fruit when it’s business and fully ripe (which can be a struggle to ascertain with berries which are still green when ripe). Store it where temperatures remain above 50 degrees Fahrenheit (10 degrees Celsius) — in other words, not in the refrigerator.

If frost threatens, select unripe tomatoes and allow them to fully ripen indoors or use instantly in specialty dishes. You might also pull the entire plant and hang it upside down in a sheltered spot until most of the fruit ripens.

Do you grow berries? Please discuss your favourite variety for where you live.

More: manuals to developing your own vegetables

See related

Rivet

The rivet is a metal fastener used to attach a substance such as timber, sheet metal, leather or plastic into some other substance. It’s an industrial look and the capacity to connect materials having a shear-force strength. Other metallic fasteners include screws, keys, pins, rings, nuts and clips.

Heather Merenda

For blending materials such as wood and steel, adhesive or screws can perform the job, but using rivets the old-school way is gaining popularity. The heated metal gets soft and is squashed to shape the head, and the layers it combines are tightly squeezed together when the metal cools and shrinks.

STRATAap Architecture

This garage door resembles the riveted boards of an airplane or a massive tanker, in which the layers of metal wouldn’t be pulled apart (pressure force) but need to withstand water or wind movement (shear force).

Jamie Laubhan-Oliver

Rivets can be secured with warmth and a hammer, or using a rivet gun, which smashes the trap without heat. Both methods create a button that is bigger than the hole it passes through, making a lasting connection.

Georgetown Development

Welding gained fame over riveting from the 1920s and’30s. Riveting demanded several workers to take on the functions of heating, tossing, catching, putting and hammering the rivets into place. Welding was a quieter process and demanded less teamwork.

GM Construction, Inc..

The placement of rivets is quantified and spaced evenly, allowing for curved and bowed surfaces such as airplanes, boats and this custom-made kitchen hood.

Beinfield Architecture PC

Rivets can have a pan head, a snap head or a mushroom head, or be countersunk, which means that the top of the rivet is flush with the surface it links. These rivets extrude, or extend outside the sheet metal.

See related

Contractor Tips: What Your Contractor Truly Means

Contractors did not become contractors because they like to convey. If they did they’d have become speechwriters or newscasters (or get a gig writing ideabooks for ). Sometimes what they say seems completely evident for them, but makes no sense for you. And a builder might talk euphemistically to dance about difficult topics. This advice should help you translate some of the euphemisms and somewhat curt statements you might hear, so that you get the maximum out of the client-contractor relationship.

1. Nothing. If he doesn’t call you back, he’s just not that into you. You do not need to chase a builder who is too busy to return your telephone, unless you have given him cash.

2. Let us do it my way rather. Odds are, your builder has more experience doing things a certain way, therefore he may want to urge that procedure. It’s usually best to go with it rather than having him try something for the first time on your job.

Buckminster Green LLC

3. I’ll begin late next week. If your overall contractor sets a beginning date, then he ought to have the ability to retain it. But a lot of times the tradesmen (electricians, technicians, etc.) juggle many jobs simultaneously and often have to take care of emergencies. You need to expect them only to come close to their beginning and completion estimates.

4. The cost will be…
Unless you’re changing the range of work, a builder won’t expect to negotiate a lump sum cost estimate. If you think the cost is too high, get the following quote for comparison. While prices vary because of differences in approaching the undertaking or overhead expenses, a builder won’t stay in business unless he prices competitively.

Uptic Studios

5. I’ll do my best. There is a good chance a contract will fall short of your expectations. If you hear this, then hear your gut. Have you been asking for a great deal? Perhaps you have added work to the extent, but asked for the job to be finished by precisely the exact same date? Are you anticipating a brand new look from a remodel with existing elements?

There are 3 elements to any project: The level of quality, the cost and the time it requires to complete the undertaking. Pick two of these that are most important to you. Should you need everything ideal by a certain date, be prepared to pay more. If you’ve got a fixed budget but need a certain look, give the contractor time to be inventive and make it work.

Anthony James Construction

6. But I can not make a recommendation. Most builders prefer that you just work. Should you request your general contractor for their plumber’s name and number and he provides it to youpersonally, thank them. By enabling you to work directly with a subcontractor your contractor requires a risk by giving up control of the situation. In addition, he gives up the power to indicate the cost of the work that the plumber does, and this is just one of the ways builders get paid.

Buckminster Green LLC

7. The layout had some tweaking. Frequently, this means that the plans were unbuildable. Sometimes what is drawn on paper just can not be constructed. A stairs you would need to crawl on your knees to utilize, “existing” spaces that don’t exist, a pocket door that would slide through a switch box along with the shower enclosure — I have seen all of them.

8. I don’t think this is a good fit. If a builder declines to estimate a job it could be for a whole lot of factors. Perhaps he has concerns regarding the budget. You and your contractor will be speaking a whole lot, so perhaps he just did not think you clicked. It could also be that he’s too busy, and that he won’t have the ability to devote enough time for your job to do it right.

Buckminster Green LLC

9. We will have to do some value engineering. You have got caviar dreams on a cheese and cracker budget. Value engineering is as soon as the team thinks creatively about how to rework the job to do the exact same or similar extent for less, like by changing material selections.

10. Let us walk through and make a hit list. A contractor wishes to know everything you need done to be satisfied with the work. Every visit to your project prices your contractor, therefore make an effort to think of a comprehensive punch list –a list of to-do things which have to be done for your job to be considered complete — instead of sending it bit by bit as time passes.

Next: 10 Home Projects That Probably Need a Guru

See related

Fantastic Design Plant: Kousa Dogwood

Cornus kousa (kousa dogwood) is a beautiful ornamental shrub that is not quite as common because its popular comparative, Cornus florida (flowering dogwood). If you’re looking for a spring bloomer for your lawn, a kousa dogwood will provide you amazing bracts for four to six weeks, some downright Dr. Seussian berries in summer time, some vibrant fall color and, as it ages, gorgeous exfoliating mottled bark to admire during the winter. Continue reading if you want to get to know the kousa dogwood better.

The New York Botanical Garden

Botanical name: Cornus kousa
Common titles: Kousa dogwood; Korean, Chinese or Japanese dogwood
USDA zones: 5 to 8 (find your zone)
Water condition: Consistent moisture
Light requirement: Full sun to partial shade
Mature size: 20 to 30 feet tall with an equal spread since it matures
Benefits and tolerances: The biggest tolerance of notice is that the kousa interrupts anthracnose disease, which plagues flowering dogwood. It prefers moist, and well-drained soils but may withstand dry and compact soils.
Seasonal interest: Lovely bracts in the spring, fruits in summer, reddish-purple foliage in fall
When to plant: Following the last frost in the spring

Liquidscapes

Distinguishing traits. Kousa dogwood is famous for being more upright than its comparative, flowering dogwood (C. florida). But as it ages, it will spread out from a vase shape into a round form. Those blooms you know and love are now bracts underneath smaller yellow-green flowers.

The New York Botanical Garden

These bracts show up at the spring and last for about six weeks since the tree leafs out, eventually turning pink with age till they drop off.

From the late summer or early fall, kousa sprouts pink edible fruits. They’re bumpy-looking berries around 1/2 inch in diameter. Once mature, they aren’t too bad. (Could you tell they’re not my personal favorite?)

As they ripen, they make more pink, turning into a dark cherry shade. These berries are the easiest way to differentiate kousa from other dogwood species.

From the fall, kousa dogwood’s leaves turn a brilliant reddish-purple. In the winter, the absence of leaves reveals lovely bark that exfoliates with age, which is just another distinctive trait.

Liquidscapes

How to utilize it. Kousa dogwood is a wonderful ornamental tree to your lawn. Use it as a specimen tree or in a grove. Because it is tolerant of shade, you might also use it at the edge of a woodland.

If you would like to maintain your dogwood’s flowering season going as long as possible, utilize it with flowering dogwoods, as kousas will bloom about a month later than flowering dogwoods.

Liquidscapes

Planting notes. Make sure that your soil is loose, fertile and well drained. Till a nice area that is at least three times the size of your root chunk.
Dig a hole twice as wide and as deep as the root ball. Loosen up its roots and place it in the pit. Fill the remainder of the hole back with soil and tamp it down. When the remainder of the pit is half filled with dirt, add water and let it drain before filling it the remainder of the way.Water it thoroughly and add a couple inches of mulch; nonetheless, don’t let the mulch touch the trunk of this tree.
More: Read more great layout plants

See related

Embrace a Hot Trend With a Kitchen Warming Drawer

Warming drawers have been sweeping kitchens across the USA! These independent appliances permit you to keep prepared meals warm, to heat dishes and to slow to evidence bread dough. Often installed with a fitting wall mount, a warming drawer can be coordinated with other kitchen appliances to obtain the look and feel of a streamlined, high-functioning kitchen.

Since the countdown to my cookery renovation continues, it seems as if I’ll be adding yet another appliance to my wish list. I love a piping-hot plate of food, so it sounds a built in streamlined warming drawer is the perfect answer for us.

What about you? Take a look at these examples and let me know what you think.

Steven Miller Design Studio, Inc..

Viking’s warming drawer beautifully matches the side-by-side fridge and microwave in this San Francisco kitchen.

Dzignit, Patrice Greene

As opposed to consume wall cabinet space, this warming basket tucks easily into normally unused space on the kitchen peninsula.

Aquidneck Properties

Warming drawers are separate appliances and are often installed to coincide with the wall mount, as exhibited in this country-style kitchen.

The Furniture Guild

It is possible to disguise your warming drawer with a custom cabinet panel.

Farinelli Construction, Inc..

The brief end of a kitchen island typically goes unused. A warming drawer is a intelligent use of the distance.

Greenbrook Homes

Put a warming drawer next to the oven, so when a dish is finished baking you can immediately tuck it away for warming.

Fran Kerzner- DESIGN SYNTHESIS

Kitchen warming drawers are intended to supply a low warmth that’s excellent for keeping meals dishes and hot warm. They can even evidence bread dough.

Glenvale Kitchens

To save space, you can stack wall mount with a warming drawer in a cooking tower cabinet module.

See related